3 Reasons Every Writer Should Make A Twitter Account

Social media is a source of entertainment for millions of people, but is there any benefit to it besides that entertainment value? Is it just a mindless way to pass time or is there something else that makes it so popular? I say there is much more to social media than what meets the eye.

Over half of my writer friends refuse to use at least one or more social media platforms and I have never understood why they are so strongly against it. Is it the presumed unprofessionalism or bland commentary? Or is it simply that they never knew what social media could do for them?

One of my favorite platforms is Twitter, and I am a firm believer that having a Twitter account can be beneficial to any writer. Here are 3 reasons why Twitter is such a great resource for writers.

1. Twitter gives you immediate access to what lit mags, journals, and publishers are promoting

If you want to get your work published, Twitter is one of the best places to find the opportunities, contests, and open submissions that get promoted by thousands of journals and publishers. Almost every publication has a Twitter account where they post about their submissions windows and contests immediately and continuously. With Twitter, you no longer have to wait on a newsletter or word of mouth to reach you and force you to frantically pull your submission together before the window closes. You will know as soon as your dream publication opens its submissions, and you’ll have the time to make sure that you send them your best. 

2. Twitter is a great platform to promote yourself and your work

After getting published, one of the main problems writers face is finding people to read their work. Bad book sales can be one of the most disappointing parts of a writing career, but social media platforms like Twitter can help you avoid that. When you get something published, Twitter becomes another way for you to tell people about it, and because Twitter is so massive, you will reach far more people with one Tweet than you would by sending emails or asking people to read what you got published.

3. You get to be part of a fun and supportive international writing community

It is so easy to feel alone when you’re writing. It is often an independent craft, and no matter how many workshops or peer reviews you experience, there will be times when you feel like you are staring down this enormous project all on your own. Whether it’s been a long day and coming back to the page feels like a chore, my revisions aren’t turning out the way I want or anything else, feeling less alone as a writer always makes me feel better, and Twitter is a great reminder that you are not alone. Every time I scroll through my feed, I see hilarious and heartfelt tweets about writing and other writers’ struggles and triumphs. There is a strong writing community on Twitter where we constantly encourage and inspire each other, and I don’t think any writer should miss out on that.

Twitter is more than just fun and games; it’s a unique and effective tool, especially for writers. It has such potential to benefit us, and all we have to do is give it the chance. Happy Tweeting, and most importantly, happy writing!

Surrealism and Survival, A Guest Post by Robin Gow

Surrealist painting,  Image credited to JR Korpa
 Image credited to JR Korpa

Last night I read my poetry master’s thesis in my childhood bedroom on a Zoom call. The walls of my room are painted like the rainforest from third grade when I obsessed over jungles and canopies. In the background, my cohort and professors could probably make out the blue sky painted on the ceiling of the room and the closet in the background that still houses old dresses, short-shorts, and cosplay costumes from high school.

I haven’t lived at my parents’ house consistently for over six years. Part of that distance has to do with coming out as a queer transgender person. I have returned after my housemates and I were unable to make rent in our New York apartment due to COVID19 closures and uncertainty of future employment.

The juxtaposition between my childhood bedroom, a place where I grappled for the first part of my life with gender, sexuality, and mental health, and the achievement of finishing an MFA as a queer trans poet, is, ironically, something I could see myself having written into a poem months
ago before any of this began.

In my poetry, I often turn to the surreal, the fantastical, the paranormal, and the absurd to make sense of the fulcrums of my life and my place in society as a queer person. The deeper we wade into the pandemic and into the increasingly disturbing and violent American landscape, the weirder and weirder I have found my poetry becoming. Usually, before the pandemic, I would take notes to write poems daily but I have found myself waking up and leaning into whatever images are stalking my thoughts. I find comfort in my strangeness because the worlds that warp and distort time feel more real and true than the present.

This past week I have been reading a collection of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky, who I admittedly only stumbled upon because there’s a Frank O’Hara poem I love titled by his name. In his poems, I find the threads of my own tilting away from realism in order to grapple with injustice. There is a sad humor to his speakers similar to O’Hara’s. In, “An Extraordinary Adventure Which Befell Vladimir Mayakovsky in a Summer Cottage,” he writes:

And beyond that village
yawned a hole,
into that hole- and not just maybe –
the sun for certain always rolled,
slowly, surely, daily.
At morn
to flood the world
again
the sun rose up-
and ruddied it.
Day after day
it happened this way,
till I got
fed up with it.

And one day I let out such a shout,
that everything grew pale,
point-blank at the sun I yelled:
“Get out!
Enough of loafing there in hell!”

This moment in the poem sticks with me because the idea the sun could retreat into a hole and then the speaker’s anger and address to the sun tells us something I think is incommunicable without turning away from “reality.” The earnestness of the speaker and the futility of yelling at
the sun is much like how I feel right now. The bends in perception capture what we are experiencing as humans who also implicated and interpolated in complex systems of oppression in a time of great loss, grief, and injustice.

The speaker shouting “Get out!” embodies how I have been experiencing time. I forget what day it is. An afternoon takes eons and then a week is totally gone. The speaker wants the persistent cycles to stop and even chastises the sun for his role in this.

I wish I had more time to find endings. Instead, I have been brought back to a physical place full many of my ghosts.

In the absurd and surreal I find my contradictions survive together. There is healing in letting the worlds of my poems unravel in ways the physical word doesn’t allow for. I’ll leave you with the last lines of a poem I wrote today:

i hope the sky is eventually mauve.
i hope the stone melts to magma
& the mountains finally get to experience
a real transformation. i too
turned to liquid & cooled in the stream.
pillow over my head.
the sun is blinking or winking
who can know which?

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Today we are excited to welcome back poet Sarah Carey on our Authors Talk series. In this podcast, Sarah shares some tips for getting “unstuck” in your creative process. She revisits an unfinished poem and walks us through her process of revision with fresh eyes—giving us some incredible insight along the way.

“Don’t give up, explore the hidden…practice self-love, forgiveness, kindness towards yourself and others, and rest.”


You can read Sarah’s poem, “Exotic Taste” in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Want to hear more from Sarah? Follow her on Twitter.


Contributor Update, Kate MacDowell

Porcelain Daemons for His Dark Materials on HBO

A huge congratulations to Superstition Review contributor, Kate MacDowell, whose beautiful hand-crafted works appear in HBO’s new gift set for fans of the show, His Dark Materials.

Kate teamed up with HBO and Big Secret to create these unique sets—complete with different daemons and a delicate laser-cut box.

Congratulations Kate, your works are truly breathtaking.


If you’d like to see more of Kate’s work, you can find her website here.

Want to see Kate’s sculptures, “Skin Changers Closet,” in Issue 15 of Superstition Review? Check them out, here.

ASU Class of 2020 First Destination Survey

Congratulations to ASU’s Class of 2020! We are so proud of what you have accomplished!

If you are an ASU student graduating this May, we encourage you to take ASU’s First Destination Survey. The survey is for undergraduate and graduate students and everyone who completes the survey will be entered in a giveaway for the chance to win a $200 Amazon gift card or an iPad.

The First Destination Survey is used to measure the effectiveness of
Arizona State University in preparing students for success after graduation. It collects a variety of data regarding a student’s post-graduation plans, such as if they have accepted a full-time position, are still looking for an opportunity, or are continuing their education.

Don’t miss out on the chance to win an Amazon gift card or an iPad! Take some time to complete the First Destination Survey today!

Survey link:

https://asu.joinhandshake.com/first_destination_surveys/2587

Survey close date:

October 10, 2020 (Six months after graduation)

Donate to SR for #GivingTuesdayNow



donate

Today, #GivingTuesdayNow is a global effort that asks each of us to support others. If you are in the fortunate position to be able to give today, SR could use your help.

Since 2008 our literary magazine, Superstition Review, has published art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction, and poetry in a beautifully designed online format that is free and open to the public. In twelve years we have published over 1300 international authors and artists, and we have mentored over 350 students. This is a community project that connects students to experts in the fields of art and literature from all over the world.

Your generous donations will provide direct opportunities to students who learn practical skills in the fields of advertising, web design, social media management, content curation, blogging, and marketing.

Your generous donations will go directly to the support of student work on the magazine:

$25 will pay for a website redirect with godaddy.com so that our website is easily accessible across the globe.

$100 will pay for our listing in the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses, which ensures our national reputation and boosts student placement in strong jobs after graduation.

$250 will cover our annual web hosting costs so that our students can learn two content management systems, WordPress and Drupal.

$500 will support student attendance at the Associated Writers and Writing Programs Conference.

Donate today to help us support authors, artists, and students. 

Intern Update: Emily Holloway

Today’s Intern Update features Emily Halloway, the Social Media Manager of Issue #17 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English, Emily currently works as a Copywriter for RevolutionParts Inc. where she has developed 158 Auto brand and model specific SEO pages and works on an ongoing blog project featuring SEO-driven articles.

She is also a self-employed Freelance Writer.

We are so proud of you Emily!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Emily’s LinkedIn here.

Contributor Update, Lisa Duffy


Join us in congratulating Lisa Duffy on her book, My Kind of People, available May 12.

My Kind of People takes place on a small island after ten year old Sky is orphaned for the second time. Each of the islands residents is effected by Sky’s situation and each have their own stories and secrets.

To learn more about Lisa and her work you can visit her website where you can preorder My Kind of People. You can also view an interview on her previous book,

The Salt House, featured in Superstition Review:

Thinking About the Characters featured in Issue 21

Congratulations Lisa!

Guest Post, Chelsea Dingman: On Writing During Ongoing Crisis

I’ve been thinking about the world we will leave our children. In the wake of what is happening with the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many people mourning the inability to return to a world as we knew it, yet this may be the only world that today’s youth will have any memory of.

Memory: fault line; fissure; an inability to reason with the past.

The instinct of a new writer might be to create drama in a piece—at least that was what I found when teaching. Some teachers I had forbid us to kill anyone in a poem or story because we felt the need to create stakes by doing so. To make people care. A professor of mine once said that all poems must have conflict, but that conflict might be as subtle as the way the light falls across the road. I want to believe him, to value that, to be able to sit still, but, when I am called to write, the ghosts ascend, the sky falls, and I can only see what is down the dark tunnel in my mind.

I’ve always written from a place of risk: what do I need to say? Why is that? Is the dramatic situation complicated in an interesting way? Do I recognize the difference between melodrama and drama? Why am I attracted to poems where the stakes are high? Must every poem be about death, somehow, some way?

What I learned through this crisis is that I have trouble writing a quietly complicated moment because I have not had time to appreciate those moments in my life in a great while. Right now, I swing between the inability to get out of bed (inertia) and being overly productive as my two coping mechanisms. I’m not sure which is less effective. Yet, crises have come in waves over the last few years, whether in the form of catastrophic weather (hurricanes on the Gulf coast where I was living), or gun control, or money problems, or health issues, or the deaths of loved ones. How can anyone be expected to write about the light falling across the road when all around us worlds are falling? On the other hand, I read Tranströmer, for example, and understand that both are possible at once.

[The site of resistance as the body]—

My father died when I was nine. I’ve written about that incident a lot. I’ve resisted calling it trauma. Yet, right now, children are experiencing trauma in a new way that feels much like that event: something that they won’t realize is traumatic until years from now. I’m trying to stay hopeful that the lives children dream of will one day be possible. I worry that, much like many of our ancestors, there will not be a place beyond struggle to reach for—which brings me back to my question: what world will we leave our children?

Contributor Update, Jesse Goolsby

Join us in congratulating Jesse Goolsby on his new collection, Acceleration Hours, which is available from University of Nevada Press and Amazon!

Acceleration Hours is a haunting collection of narratives about families, life, and loss during America’s twenty-first-century forever wars. Set across the mountain west of the United States, these fierce, original, and compelling stories illuminate the personal search for human connection and intimacy. From a stepfather’s grief to an AWOL soldier and her journey of reconciliation to a meditation on children, violence, and hope, Acceleration Hours is an intense and necessary portrayal of the many voices living in a time of perpetual war.

To learn more about Jesse and his work you can visit his website. You can also check out one of the stories in Acceleration Hours which was featured in Superstition Review:

“Benevolence” featured in Issue 10.

Congratulations Jesse!