3 Reasons Every Writer Should Make A Twitter Account

Social media is a source of entertainment for millions of people, but is there any benefit to it besides that entertainment value? Is it just a mindless way to pass time or is there something else that makes it so popular? I say there is much more to social media than what meets the eye.

Over half of my writer friends refuse to use at least one or more social media platforms and I have never understood why they are so strongly against it. Is it the presumed unprofessionalism or bland commentary? Or is it simply that they never knew what social media could do for them?

One of my favorite platforms is Twitter, and I am a firm believer that having a Twitter account can be beneficial to any writer. Here are 3 reasons why Twitter is such a great resource for writers.

1. Twitter gives you immediate access to what lit mags, journals, and publishers are promoting

If you want to get your work published, Twitter is one of the best places to find the opportunities, contests, and open submissions that get promoted by thousands of journals and publishers. Almost every publication has a Twitter account where they post about their submissions windows and contests immediately and continuously. With Twitter, you no longer have to wait on a newsletter or word of mouth to reach you and force you to frantically pull your submission together before the window closes. You will know as soon as your dream publication opens its submissions, and you’ll have the time to make sure that you send them your best. 

2. Twitter is a great platform to promote yourself and your work

After getting published, one of the main problems writers face is finding people to read their work. Bad book sales can be one of the most disappointing parts of a writing career, but social media platforms like Twitter can help you avoid that. When you get something published, Twitter becomes another way for you to tell people about it, and because Twitter is so massive, you will reach far more people with one Tweet than you would by sending emails or asking people to read what you got published.

3. You get to be part of a fun and supportive international writing community

It is so easy to feel alone when you’re writing. It is often an independent craft, and no matter how many workshops or peer reviews you experience, there will be times when you feel like you are staring down this enormous project all on your own. Whether it’s been a long day and coming back to the page feels like a chore, my revisions aren’t turning out the way I want or anything else, feeling less alone as a writer always makes me feel better, and Twitter is a great reminder that you are not alone. Every time I scroll through my feed, I see hilarious and heartfelt tweets about writing and other writers’ struggles and triumphs. There is a strong writing community on Twitter where we constantly encourage and inspire each other, and I don’t think any writer should miss out on that.

Twitter is more than just fun and games; it’s a unique and effective tool, especially for writers. It has such potential to benefit us, and all we have to do is give it the chance. Happy Tweeting, and most importantly, happy writing!

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Authors Talk: Sarah Carey

Today we are excited to welcome back poet Sarah Carey on our Authors Talk series. In this podcast, Sarah shares some tips for getting “unstuck” in your creative process. She revisits an unfinished poem and walks us through her process of revision with fresh eyes—giving us some incredible insight along the way.

“Don’t give up, explore the hidden…practice self-love, forgiveness, kindness towards yourself and others, and rest.”


You can read Sarah’s poem, “Exotic Taste” in Issue 18 of Superstition Review.

Want to hear more from Sarah? Follow her on Twitter.


Contributor Update, Kate MacDowell

Porcelain Daemons for His Dark Materials on HBO

A huge congratulations to Superstition Review contributor, Kate MacDowell, whose beautiful hand-crafted works appear in HBO’s new gift set for fans of the show, His Dark Materials.

Kate teamed up with HBO and Big Secret to create these unique sets—complete with different daemons and a delicate laser-cut box.

Congratulations Kate, your works are truly breathtaking.


If you’d like to see more of Kate’s work, you can find her website here.

Want to see Kate’s sculptures, “Skin Changers Closet,” in Issue 15 of Superstition Review? Check them out, here.

ASU Class of 2020 First Destination Survey

Congratulations to ASU’s Class of 2020! We are so proud of what you have accomplished!

If you are an ASU student graduating this May, we encourage you to take ASU’s First Destination Survey. The survey is for undergraduate and graduate students and everyone who completes the survey will be entered in a giveaway for the chance to win a $200 Amazon gift card or an iPad.

The First Destination Survey is used to measure the effectiveness of
Arizona State University in preparing students for success after graduation. It collects a variety of data regarding a student’s post-graduation plans, such as if they have accepted a full-time position, are still looking for an opportunity, or are continuing their education.

Don’t miss out on the chance to win an Amazon gift card or an iPad! Take some time to complete the First Destination Survey today!

Survey link:

https://asu.joinhandshake.com/first_destination_surveys/2587

Survey close date:

October 10, 2020 (Six months after graduation)

Donate to SR for #GivingTuesdayNow



donate

Today, #GivingTuesdayNow is a global effort that asks each of us to support others. If you are in the fortunate position to be able to give today, SR could use your help.

Since 2008 our literary magazine, Superstition Review, has published art, fiction, interviews, nonfiction, and poetry in a beautifully designed online format that is free and open to the public. In twelve years we have published over 1300 international authors and artists, and we have mentored over 350 students. This is a community project that connects students to experts in the fields of art and literature from all over the world.

Your generous donations will provide direct opportunities to students who learn practical skills in the fields of advertising, web design, social media management, content curation, blogging, and marketing.

Your generous donations will go directly to the support of student work on the magazine:

$25 will pay for a website redirect with godaddy.com so that our website is easily accessible across the globe.

$100 will pay for our listing in the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses, which ensures our national reputation and boosts student placement in strong jobs after graduation.

$250 will cover our annual web hosting costs so that our students can learn two content management systems, WordPress and Drupal.

$500 will support student attendance at the Associated Writers and Writing Programs Conference.

Donate today to help us support authors, artists, and students. 

Intern Update: Emily Holloway

Today’s Intern Update features Emily Halloway, the Social Media Manager of Issue #17 of Superstition Review.

With a BA in English, Emily currently works as a Copywriter for RevolutionParts Inc. where she has developed 158 Auto brand and model specific SEO pages and works on an ongoing blog project featuring SEO-driven articles.

She is also a self-employed Freelance Writer.

We are so proud of you Emily!

If you’d like to learn more, you can visit Emily’s LinkedIn here.

Contributor Update, Lisa Duffy


Join us in congratulating Lisa Duffy on her book, My Kind of People, available May 12.

My Kind of People takes place on a small island after ten year old Sky is orphaned for the second time. Each of the islands residents is effected by Sky’s situation and each have their own stories and secrets.

To learn more about Lisa and her work you can visit her website where you can preorder My Kind of People. You can also view an interview on her previous book,

The Salt House, featured in Superstition Review:

Thinking About the Characters featured in Issue 21

Congratulations Lisa!

Contributor Update, Jesse Goolsby

Join us in congratulating Jesse Goolsby on his new collection, Acceleration Hours, which is available from University of Nevada Press and Amazon!

Acceleration Hours is a haunting collection of narratives about families, life, and loss during America’s twenty-first-century forever wars. Set across the mountain west of the United States, these fierce, original, and compelling stories illuminate the personal search for human connection and intimacy. From a stepfather’s grief to an AWOL soldier and her journey of reconciliation to a meditation on children, violence, and hope, Acceleration Hours is an intense and necessary portrayal of the many voices living in a time of perpetual war.

To learn more about Jesse and his work you can visit his website. You can also check out one of the stories in Acceleration Hours which was featured in Superstition Review:

“Benevolence” featured in Issue 10.

Congratulations Jesse!

Guest Post, Fiction Editor Lucas Selby

Being isolated in our homes gives us writers that sweet time we always crave to actually get some writing done. Personally, I’ve been reading through my old work, sprucing it up and sending it in to some of my favorite magazines. I might as well while I have the time, right?

One of the most helpful parts of being the Fiction Editor for Superstition Review this year has been learning what editors look for in writing. And since it’s been helpful for me, I thought it might be helpful for you! Here’s an insider’s look on the selection process here at Superstition Review.

The first thing I did as Fiction Editor was make a mistake. I linked my editor’s account on Submittable to my personal submissions account. That means, every time I opened Submittable to review submissions, the first thing I saw was all of my rejections for stories I’ve submitted over the years. For the first hundred stories, I felt like I owed it to every author to at least read their story all the way through, because that’s what I want for all of my stories. Soon enough, I was weeks behind on deadlines and extremely tired of reading every page of the stories that I didn’t enjoy. Thus, I learned my first lesson.

Lesson 1: It’s the first page or two that makes or breaks a story. If I’m bored early on, I will not read the rest. Make that first page captivating enough to make me read the second page, then make that page captivating enough to make me read the rest of the story. Otherwise, I do not have the time.

I started catching up, but I was still behind. Submissions poured in faster than I could read them. Our Founding Editor called me and gave me some new helpful advice. We are a magazine that does not read blind. That means we read your bio and cover letter before we read your story. Trust me, the bio and cover letter are more important than you may think.

Lesson 2: Don’t waste your editor’s time with your bio and cover letter. By all means, include a bio and cover letter, but this is a brief blurb about who you are, your degree if applicable, any major awards you’ve earned for your writing, and maybe where else you’re published. This is not your resume, your life story, or a list of your Boy Scout merit badges.

Finally, I had all my favorite stories picked out. I met with our Founding Editor and the Senior Fiction Editor, and we compared notes. Unsurprisingly, all three of us have different tastes in fiction, but none of us caved to the others. We fought for the fiction we liked, and, in the end, we all left happy. This lesson is a stretch, but bare with me.

Lesson 3: Your story doesn’t have to be universal. I feel I have to address this because lots of literature is praised for being universal. There are plenty of good niche stories out there, and they are all the better because they aren’t forced to appeal to everyone. We all fought for the stories we felt the strongest about, and we all had our absolute favorites published.

I’m really proud of the upcoming fiction section in Superstition Review. The authors who wrote the stories we’re publishing should be proud as well. The authors of the stories that didn’t make the cut but were counted among our favorites should be proud. Everyone who submitted should be proud that they put their work out there.

Lesson 4: Keep writing, keep submitting, keep aiming for publication in your favorite magazines. Every time I logged on to Submittable to review new fiction submissions, I saw all of my rejections from over the years. Honestly, I was proud of them. That’s how many times I’ve put myself out there with stories I was proud of.

Keep up the good work! And thanks for a fantastic submission season.

Contributor Update, Mathew Michael Hodges

Join us in congratulating Mathew Michael Hodges on his book, The Way Rain Falls, which releases on May 1st from Whiskey Tit Press.

The Way Rain Falls centers around Jim Diffin, a college sophomore struggling to gain the affection of his perfect girl while also dealing with his mother’s hardships and his friend’s dubious advice.

Pre-order The Way Rain Falls from Whiskey Tit Press!

To learn more about Mathew and his work you can visit his website. You can also view his previous work featured in Superstition Review:

A Sound Man featured in Issue 18

Congratulations Mathew!