Virtual Reading Featuring S[r] Contributor

Don’t miss this week’s installment of the Fire Hydrant Reading Series! It will feature readings from past Superstition Review Contributor, Thomas Legendre, and Fire Hydrant Reading Series co-creator, Kristi Carter.

This free and virtual event will take place this Wednesday, August 13th at 12pm Central Time and will last about 30 minutes. It will take place over Zoom at this link or Meeting ID 972 9633 0154. The event passcode is 081320.  

Read more about Thomas Legendre here and watch past installments of the Fire Hydrant Reading Series here.

Contributor Update: Mark Haunschild

Hello everyone! Today we have some extremely exciting news to share. Our very own poetry advisor, Mark Haunschild, has been chosen as the featured poet this month in A Dozen Nothing. His awesome poems such as: “Wagstaff”, “An Exit”, “Cairn”, and many more can be read on their website here.

Mark has served as a poetry advisor for Superstition Review since issue 6 in Fall 2010. A Dozen Nothing

 

Contributor Update: Valerie Bandura

Today we are excited to announce that our former interview advisor, Valerie Bandura, has been recently featured on Verse Daily. Her poem “Evil” from her collection of poems, Human Interest, can be read on their website here. If you end up loving it (which you most probably will) go grab yourself a copy of Human Interest, in which Valerie talks about game shows, Kardashians, bad fathers, Black Sabbath, and much more. To do so click here!

Poem Evil featured in Verse Daily

Contributor Update: Amie Whittemore

Today we have some very exciting news to share about past contributor Amie Whittemore. Amie was recently featured in an interview with Jason Lee Brown for the online magazine Smile Politely. Check it out on their website hereSmile Politely Interview

Amie’s poem “Lunar Eclipse” was featured in issue 18 of Superstition Review. To read it click here.

Contributor Update: Barbara Crooker

We are excited to announce that past contributor Barbara Crooker was recently featured on Verse-Virtual Journal. It can be read on their website here. Her poem, “Entering The House of Awe” is filled with powerful imagery you don’tEntering The House of Awe want to miss.

Barbara was featured in issue 2 of Superstition Review. You can read three of her poems here.

Contributor Update: Nicholas Hughes

Nicholas Hughes bio photoPast contributing artist Nicholas Hughes’ new book is now available for preorder. The book collects high quality first monographs of Nicholas’ fine art photography. Check out the book on the crowdfunding page here, including a three minute trailer.

Nicholas’ photographs were featured in Issue 17 of Superstition Review and can be accessed here.

Contributor Update: Sarah Pape

Past contributor Sarah Pape is the managing editor at the literary journal Watershed Review. The journal recently launched it’s spring issue for 2017 which features some impressive fiction, poetry, and artwork. The journal was founded in 1977 and operates out of California State University, Chico. Check out Watershed Review online here.

And check out two of Sarah Pape’s poems in issue 8 of Superstition Review here.

Contributor Update: Kevin Prufer

Greetings, dear readers! We’ve got some tremendous news for you all today: past contributor Kevin Prufer, featured in the Interviews section of our 7th Issue, has a poem in the Spring 2017 issue of The Paris Review, titled “The Translator.” Check it out here, and do yourself the kindness of reading our interview with Kevin here. If you’d like to see more Kevin’s work, go ahead and check out his website, found here. Congratulations, Kevin! And readers, stay posted for more updates on the happenings of the incredible community here at Superstition Review.

Read "The Translator!"
Past contributor Kevin Prufer, whose poem “The Translator” was featured in the Spring 2017 issue of The Paris Review.

Contributor Update: Roy Guzman

Good afternoon, everybody! Today brings exciting developments from the field: past contributor Roy Guzman, featured in the Poetry section of our 18th issue, has been selected to have his poetry included in the brand new anthology from Tia Chucha Press, titled The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States. The anthology is scheduled for release this month, and was edited by Leticia Hernández Linares, Rubén Martínez, and Héctor Tobar, with a foreword by Juan José Dalton. Go pre-order this brilliant collection of work here, and do yourself a favor (if you haven’t already) and go read Guzman’s poem in our 18th issue here. Let us know what you think in the comments section below!

Pre-order now!
The cover for The Wandering Song, featuring the work of past contributor Roy Guzman.

 

Contributor Update, Colleen Abel: Get Liberated with “deviants”

How does the day find you, readers? It finds us supremely excited, as we’ve got some great news for you. The wonderful poet and friend of the Superstition Review, Colleen Abel, recently was crowned the victor of Sundress Publications Chapbook Contest for 2016, and as is often the case with these contests, everybody wins with the release of her upcoming chapbook “Deviants,” which is available FOR FREE over at Sundress Publications’ website, found here.

Regarding “Deviants” Victoria Chang writes:

“Colleen Abel’s wonderful book, Deviant, is mesmerizing—once I began, I couldn’t stop reading. The speaker provides a moving account—sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes wry, and oftentimes both—of what it means to be ‘fat’ in this world. The central piece is called ‘Fat Studies’ with references to sociologists and humorous pieces about Jackie Kennedy. Ultimately, Deviants is a beautiful book by a talented writer on material so many of us can understand and relate to, but oftentimes don’t have the opportunity to read in this form.”

Staci R. Schoenfeld, the judge for the Chapbook Contest, writes:

“In Deviants, ‘The eye alters all that it falls on.’ And the eye is everywhere—in every poem and in the lyric essay, ‘Fat Studies.’ There is no escape, even in the darkness: ‘It’s true I like you better in the dark. / Deep dark. Where I can’t even see your face.’ And the eye is keen in its appraisal. What it sees is what is most often offered up for alteration—the female body. The poems and the lyric essay all deal in issues of body. These bodies are not, however, places of comfort and safety. Instead the body is dangerous: ‘My heart is not a heart, it is a little nest of razorblades. I look soft, but if you touch me, your hands will be instantly pulverized, as if you had slammed them into concrete.’ Or the body becomes something to escape: ‘If it helps, I don’t want to be myself / either—to slip out of this body when / when you enter, to exchange within the puff / of magic smoke my life for another. / Leave me other.’ The body is in turns stark and lush and finally ‘the body / is a planet you tilt / on its axis spinning.’ Deviants left me both spinning and altered. It made me want to say, Thank you for helping me understand.”

Check out the full press release from Sundress Publications here.

Download, read, and be as inspired as we find ourselves by Colleen Abel’s “Deviants.”

Read this chapbook!
The cover for Colleen Abel’s “Deviants.”